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Sewing Blog

Studio Sale November 17



Shop unique pieces from the archive in sizes XS to XL or take home fabrics, notions, accessories or embroidery pieces. Invite your friends and join the event on Facebook for previews and other updates.
 
RSVP & INVITE YOUR FRIENDS


C H A R L O T T E K A N
Samples & Stock includig unique pieces from the archive that have not been available before €5,- to €50,- Sizes XS t/m XL
Fabrics (part bio & fair trade) €5,- tot €10,- p/m

When?
Saturday, November 17th from 11:00 – 17:00

Where?
Gerrit van de Lindestraat 86-b
3022TR Rotterdam

How to get there?
Easy to reach with tramlines 21, 23, 24 and there are plenty of paid parking spots in the area.

How to Pay
cash & pin

Hope to see you there!

 

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Slow Fashion October, week 1: What’s your look?

DIY wardrobe inspiration for slow fashion October

It's Slow Fashion October! Curious what it's all about, you can find the details and the backstory here on Fringe Association

Slow fashion, slow everything is dear to my heart. through the years I've slowly  taken steps in a more sustainable direction. I've given a lot of thought to what works for me and what aspects are important for me.

Fashion is just one of the many fields where I am taking a more conscious approach.

I'm in the process of switching to soap bars to reduce plastic waste, eat mostly plant based from local sources, mend my clothing to they last longer and much more.

A lot of small steps and many of those steps were inspired by the online community, people asking questions, opening up the discussion and that's why I am particitpating in slow fashion october to join the discussion and also to take a moment to reflect on where I stand and where I want to go in the coming year.

So here are this weeks discussion points:

DIY wardrobe inspiration for slow fashion October

Do you have a color palette?

Yes! I do! I've carefully curated my cranberry themed wardrobe in the past few year ;) My main colours are cranberry, blush pink, black, dark blue (jeans), grey (jeans), offwhite, lilac, dark grey and navy with a touch of orange.

DIY wardrobe inspiration for slow fashion October

Whose style inspires you; do you have a muse or icon?

I don't have a specific icon or muse. My inspiration comes from many places and women and brands.

I started collecting my inspiration in two pinterest moodboards. One specifically to inspire my handmade wardrobe and one for general closet inspiration. 

DIY Wardrobe Inspiration
 
Slow fashion wardrobe inspiration

Closet Inspiration
DIY wardrobe inspiration for slow fashion October

Is there a brand you’re always drawn to, for their clothes and/or how they put them together? Why?

I am drawn to Isabel Marant. I love the strong and feminine look. I own a few pieces that I'm very fond of like the knit sweater on one of the first photos.


What shapes and styles of garments work best for you, your life and your body?


I basically have two favorite shapes;

1. Skinny bottom + high waist + cropped top + there must be pockets

2. Skinny bottom + voluminous top chinched in waist + there must be pockets

My figure is fairly straigth so accentuating my waist is a recurring thing and wearing skinny bottoms.

DIY wardrobe inspiration for slow fashion October


What are your clothing pet peeves?

I hardly ever button the cuffs of the shirts I wear or when I do I uncuff them within 5 minutes. It just feels so uncomfortable. I'd rather wear them rolled up which looks a lot better anyway.


What is your favorite garment or outfit (right now or always) and why?

My highwaisted jeans from a local designer combined with my Garçonne shirt in a Liberty London fabric

Slow Fashhion October

What is the image you would like to project with your clothing?

I want to look feminine and effortlessly cool + casual, and simple but to put this in perspective...as I'm typing this I am wearing a pair of pants filled with paint spots and a worn seat, an old event shirt and flip flops. Sometimes I care deeply how I look and sometimes it just has to be functional.


Can you describe your style in five adjectives?

Feminine / Casual / Simple / Comfy / Functional

DIY wardrobe inspiration for slow fashion October

What showed up in your mood board that surprised you?

The ochre and pink combination! I realize I love it, but have not incorporated this into my wardrobe. I could use a bit of contrast.

Also the shirts with a quotes them...I never manage to find one that I feel comfortable wearing, but one day!!


What’s an example of something you own and love (had to have!) but never wear, and why not?

Heels! I adore how they look. It's never been a match made in heaven,  but since I broke my ankle a couple of years ago I can't seem to get the hang of wearing them anymore, so I'm team sneaker basically seven days a week.

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Sewing knits on your sewing machine - Tips & Tricks

sewing knits without an overlocker

I've owned a serger (or overlocker) from when I started sewing, so I've mostly been able to use a serger instead of a sewing machine. That being said, I have used a sewing machine on knits (hemming, attaching elastic, sewing underwear, topstitching, etc.) So below are a few tips and tricks from my experiences working with knits.

The key to good results is taking the time to test what stitches and needles work for your chosen fabric. I can’t stress this enough, but testing is essential! So test, test and test again. Below are some tips and starting points for your tests.

 
There isn't one way of doing this, so you'll have to find out what works best for your project and play with the settings of your sewing machine, and I say play because I think that's the best approach! have fun and get acquainted with your sewing machine.


TEST

Use the offcuts from your chosen fabric for the tests, because every fabric is different results can be quite different on a seemingly similar fabric. Pull the stitches with force to check for popping stitches and if your stitches pop you’ll need a shorter stitch length or use a different stitch. You often get better results, by shortening the stitch length than widening the stitch, because widening the stitch can cause tunneling.

If you see grinning or a ladder when you pull the side seams apart you need to adjust the tension. Some grinning will always happen when you pull the sides open, but when you let go the stitching should spring back to normal. Unless you have a walking foot it might be necessary to lower the tension on the presser foot to avoid wavy seams or rippling. Make notes as you adjust the tension and always turn in small increments.I find it helpful to think of the screw as a clock and only turn 10 minutes at a time. If there is a bit of rippling on a hem or waist seam, keep in mind that you probably won't see it when you are wearing your piece because they will be stretched while it's on you.

UNIVERSAL VS. STRETCH / BALLPOINT NEEDLES

When sewing knits, skip the universal needle, because there is a risk of holes and skipped stitches. So If you don’t already own them, buy both stretch as well as jersey needles so you can compare results.

When I was comparing universal to ballpoint and stretch needles on the sport Lycra and the modern jersey (both from Spoonflower btw) I haven't seen any holes when using a universal needle even so, skipped stitches were very common. Now my test were on small swatches, so you can imagine there would be quite a lot of skipped stitches on a longer seam.

That being said, here is an example of a 100% cotton jersey I bought years ago that was a nightmare to work with. I've used different needles in this sample to show you there was a big difference between some of the needles, but I never managed to get it right. I ended up using the jersey for sampling so it wasn't wasted, but it was super frustrating. Luckily this happened only once in 18 years of sewing and production.

As you can see there are a lot of holes using the universal needle and the ballpoint needle. The stretch needle was the best match, but even though you can hardly see it there are still a few tiny holes. Fun times indeed.

sewing with knits without a serger - sewing knits on a regular sewing machine

WHAT STITCHES TO USE

All you need is a stitch that stretches, like a zigzag stitch, so if this is all you have...you can sew knits! Chances are that your machine has a few other stitches to choose from. Try them on your chosen fabric to decide what’s best for your project and preference. I’ve compiled a list with just a few of the possible stitches and their uses. Play with stitch length and width to find the sweet spot.

Make sure you make notes as zig zag different lengths and widths and pull firmly to check if your preferred settings have enough stretch.

sewing knits with a regular sewing machine - zig zag stitch on knit fabrics

SEAMS

A narrow zigzag stitch is a great starting point for your seams, however, if you have other stitches such a as the ones below, try them because they are stronger. The downside of these stitches is that they are a pain to unpick, so if you are unsure of the fit use a basting stitch first:

- Zigzag stitch. Here are a few settings to start from when you are swatching.

Super stretchy fabrics:

  • stitch length 1 -1,5 mm (17 – 25 SPI)
  • zigzag width 2 – 3


Stretchy fabrics:

  • stitch length 2 – 2,5 mm (13 – 17 SPI)
  • zigzag width 0,5 -1


- Three-step zigzag stitch
- Lightning bolt stitch
- Straight stretch stitch
- Overlock stitch


HEMS

When you are hemming knits on your sewing machine there is a big chance the result will be wavy. If you can adjust the tension on your pressure foot or use a walking foot to get a flat result. Another option is to stabilise the hem first with a fusible interfacing or wonder tape which washes out after you are done.

- Zigzag stitch
- Twin needle, emulates a coverstitch by creating two lines of stitching.
- Raw edge. It’s an option to leave the edges raw, since knits don’t fray like wovens do, however this option is less durable and edges can and will roll over.
- Hand sew the hem using a blind hem stitch.

An example of the raw edges i used on the neckline for a dress. I think it worked well for the dress and this fabric. the neckline in the back did roll, but i didn't mind. This dress was a quick make, but held up well over the years.

raw edge finish on knit fabric

If you use a raw edge, you can hand tack the seam to one side.

using raw edges with knit hems - raw edge knit fabric neck line
Sewing by hand can be a great option for the more delicate knits like the crepe knit fabric I used in this dress. I did a single fold and did a blind stitch over the raw edge. The stitches are very loose to give it enough stretch. I like that you can see the tiny stitches on the outside of the hem even if they aren't perfectly aligned.

sewing knits without a coverstitchblind hem on knit fabric - sewing knits by hand

I've regularly left edges raw on more delicate and less stable knits to avoid twin needles and I've also use the rolling effect as a design feature in the Elskan dress / top. The front waterfall nekline is left raw and gives a nice rolling effect. The grey stretch cotton jersey handles the raw edges well even on the sleeve hem, where there is a lot more wear and tear. All in all leaving the edges raw isn't just a great short cut!

ATTACHING ELASTIC

- Zigzag stitch
- Three-step zigzag stitch, is a strong and stretchy stitch, a top pick for attaching elastic.

Here you can see a detail of an elasticated waist of a legging. I've attached the elastic with a three-step zigzag stitch and topstitched with the same stitch. It's a strong and stretchy stitch and very handy when attaching elastic to a legging for example.

attaching elastic to a legging with a zig zag stitch This is a great option if you are sewing a pair of leggings like the Parsec leggings

TOPSTITCHING

Great for adding strength and detail. to your garment., however it also adds more thread so check if you like how it feels against your skin. In addition, topstitching stitches are often more complicated stitches, therefore they take a lot longer, use more thread and they are harder to unpick.

Before topstitching, trim the seam allowance to about 0,7 cm / 1/5”. You can either open the seam or fold to one side. You can use any stitch you like as long as it has a sufficient amount of stretch, for example:

- Zigzag stitch
- Three-step zigzag stitch
- Straight stretch stitch
- Overlock stitch
- Stretch knit overlock
- Closed overlock
- Featherstitch
- Honeycomb stitch

As you can see with this closed overlock stitch there is a big difference in how it looks with different settings. On the left too big and wide, but on the right it was just right, this was my favorite.

sewing performance knits on a regular sewing machine
Here is an example of the feather stitch. First I did a straight stretch stitch, opened up the seam and toptstitch on the right side of the fabric. On the top left you also see a test with the three-step zig zag which gives a nice thick zig zag.

sewing your own sportswear - sewing knits on a regular sewing machine

These three swatches show a lot of different settings and stitches.
- On the top,  honeycomb stitch and the overlock stitch, both look a it off
- In the middle, feather stitch, witch stitch (translated that one from my Dutch manual) and the honeycomb stitch with different settings.
- The honeycomb stitch with different settings.

Sewing knits on a regular sewing machine

The stitches below might not be that common, I've only seen them on one of my Pfaff sewing machines, but I like the look.
- Top: Witch stitch (translated that one from my Dutch manual) + Cover stitch ( also translated from my Dutch manual).
- Cover stitch ( translated from my Dutch manual)

sewing with knits tips and tricks - sewing knits with a regular sewing machine

Here you see I used a different colour in the back, so that I could check the tension. As you can see the seam is opened up before topstitching.

Tips and tricks for sewing with knits
what stitches to use sewing knits on a regular sewing machine

STITCH SYMBOLS


Because your machine might have slightly different names for the stitches I've mentioned, here are a few of the stitch symbols for reference. I've left out the ones that were specific to one of my machnines. In the end it all depends on what your machine has to offer.


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Introducing Parsec Leggings PDF Sewing Pattern

pdf sewing pattern leggings

Run a mile or a parsec in these basic leggings made for 4-way stretch fabrics.

These easy to sew leggings are a great canvas for bold prints or for adding your own style lines. The leggings  are a quick and easy project, because the sewing pattern only has one piece, there is no side seam, only an inseam.

It features 3 inseam lengths and an elastic waist. The pattern has a lot of negative ease and works best with 4-way stretch fabrics with at least 70% crosswise stretch and 50% lengthwise stretch.

Check out the details here

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How to: Embroidered Ginkgo Leaf Brooch

free embroidery pattern ginkgo leaf and tutorial

I’ve just added a new embroidery class to Skillshare My class is on hand embroidery and, you’ll learn how to embroider a small ginkgo leaf using the chain stitch and turn it into a small brooch with a leather or corkleather backing. It's an intermediate level class, but if you are a confident beginner you can give it a try. The class includes a free ginkgo leaf embroidery pattern in different shapes and sizes.

What we'll cover in this online embroidery class:

- Materials & tools

- How to transfer the embroidery design onto fabric light and dark fabrics

- Threading your embroidery needle & invisible ways to start your thread

- Chain stitch & reverse chain stitch

- Double Running Stitch or Holbein Stitch to outline the leaf

- How to turn your embroidered leaf into a brooch with textile glue and (cork)leather

If you’re not familiar, Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes on everything from business to graphic design to sashiko embroidery and sewing – it’s the Netflix of learning.

By using this link to my class to sign up for a Skillshare Premium Membership, not only will you be able to enroll in my class, but you’ll also gain access to all other classes on Skillshare starting with a two-month free trial.

If you know of anyone else that’d be interested to learn ho to embroider a ginkgo leaf brooch  I’d appreciate if you’d share the link with them too.

Thanks and enjoy your weekend!

Tutorial how to make an embroidered brooch ginkgo leaf

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STUDIO SALE MAY 26TH


Shop unique pieces from the archive in sizes XS to XL or take home one of Nina's wearable artworks. Invite your friends and join the event on Facebook for previews and other updates.
 
RSVP & INVITE YOUR FRIENDS


C H A R L O T T E K A N
Samples & Stock includig unique pieces from the archive that have not been available before €5,- to €50,-
Fabrics (part bio & fair trade) €5,- tot €10,- p/m


N I N A V A L K H O F F
Nina will bring a new collection of handpainted vintage bags and purses, with a special discount on the 26th only.

Website / Instagram / Facebook
Nina Valkhoff Handpainted Vintage Bags and Purses

When?
Saturday, May 26th from 11:00 – 18:00

Where?
Gerrit van de Lindestraat 86-b
3022TR Rotterdam

How to get there?
Easy to reach with tramlines 21, 23, 24 and there are plenty of paid parking spots in the area.

Charlotte Kan - cash & pin
Nina Valkhoff - cash & bank transfer

RSVP & INVITE YOUR FRIENDS

Hope to see you the 26th!

 

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How to Store Your Embroidery Floss

how to organize and store embroidery floss

There are many ways to store your embroidery floss, but here's my favorite. I have a lot of skeins that I use during workshops, so I need to unpack them and pack them in a way that keeps the colours together. If you knit you've probably already recognise the stitchholder i'm using. It was an epiphany when I finally realized I could use them to organize my embroidery floss. I can store 12 skeins on one pin and then stack all the skeins into a clear box where they sort of hold themselves up.

These are 13,5cm stitchholders from prym. You can find these and many others on Amazon (affiliate link)

 

embroidery floss storage tip and trickhow to store embroidery floss

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Cherry Blossom Embroidery Class

For the last few weeks, I’ve been working on my first class for Skillshare and today it’s officially live!

My class is on hand embroidery, where you’ll learn how to embroider blossom using only a few embroidery stitches. It's great for a total newb, but if you are a seasoned embroiderer there might be some new techniques and ideas for you too and the class includes the cherry blossom pdf pattern and a branch sampler pattern.

And it's no april's fool joke! Because for the last 1,5 years I've been teaching many creative workshops on sewing and embroidery in The New Habderdashery. I loved it wanted to keep teaching and thought it would be fun to continue teaching workshops not only offline but online too.

If you’re not familiar, Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes on everything from business to graphic design to sashiko embroidery and sewing – it’s the Netflix of learning.

By using this link to my class to sign up for a Skillshare Premium Membership, not only will you be able to enroll in my class, but you’ll also gain access to all other classes on Skillshare starting with a two-month free trial.

If you know of anyone else that’d be interested to learn Blossom Embroidery Class, I’d appreciate if you’d share the link with them too.

Thanks and enjoy your weekend!

hand embroidery class cherry blossom embroidery

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